Energy efficiency doesn’t boast the sex appeal of solar or wind power, but it gets results.

And influencing more people to champion the cause could siphon off a large resource of untapped energy savings. At least that’s the conclusion of a study released this week by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, or ACEEE.

After all, the nation’s largest single user of energy — accounting for about half — is homes and commercial buildings, said William Fay, executive director of the Energy Efficient Codes Coalition, this week. Fay made his remarks at the Final Action Hearings for the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code in Charlotte, N.C. on Monday where building officials from across the country voted for a series of new building energy codes expected to improve energy efficiency in new buildings by 30 percent, according to BrighterEnergy.org.

The ACEEE study’s authors said programs that motivate green behavior could lead to significant savings and should be implemented with greater zeal. “We need to design and build programs that change habits as well as light bulbs,” they said.

The sentiment reflects that of Art Rosenfeld, the nuclear physicist and California energy commissioner, a pioneer and tireless advocate of energy efficiency. He was dubbed the Godfather of Green by KQED and told CBS news in a past interview that the United States’ descent into an unrepentant energy guzzler can be explained simply: “Energy in the U.S. is dirt cheap. And what’s dirt cheap is treated like dirt.”

Rosenfeld adopted the position advocated by ACEEE early on, successfully working to change consumers’ wasteful habits in California.

The state got the message — with Rosenfeld’s help — back in the 1970s at the height of the anti-nuclear movement. To avoid building another reactor, the state went with energy efficiency, improving building and appliance standards. The result: the Rosenfeld Effect, which resulted in the flattening of the state’s per capita energy use.

ACEEE’s researchers made a number of recommendations for enhancing the acceptance of energy efficiency. One was increasing the visibility of energy using behaviors. One particular program, already offered by PG&E’s smart meters, allows consumers to see more clearly how much power they consume.

The smart meter on my house enabled me to monitor power consumption of my new SEER 13 air conditioning unit. I had switched from an evaporative, or swamp cooler, and was worried about ballooning electric bills. Fortunately, those didn’t come to pass, and my family was able to keep summer cooling bills relatively low, keeping the thermostat on 78 degrees.

We’re still not great about dealing with vampire power — the electronic devices all over the home constantly sucking energy and consuming as much or more than 10 percent of a home’s power demand.

Changing habits can make a big difference to the environment, not just the bottom line. As Rosenfeld said, “To delay global warming, you get halfway there with efficiency.”

Energy efficiency is what many refer to as the “low-lying fruit” in the move to clean energy. For instance, a recent report by Boulder, Colo.-based Pike Research estimates potential annual energy savings of more than $41.1 billion if all U.S. commercial space built as of 2010 were included in a 10-year retrofit program.

The next step in the clean energy movement is more costly.

Rosenfeld said renewables like solar and wind should be pursued once energy efficiency is addressed. “But renewables cost you money, while efficiency saves money,” he said.

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